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BREAKING: Trump Issuing Death Penalty To Them ALL Under New Policy – Dems FREAKING OUT!

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n an unprecedented move this week President Trump suggested using capital punishment for drug dealers in order to crack down on America’s opioid epidemic.

 

 

The President’s comments came just a few days after it was reported that he had been praising Singapore’s mandatory death penalty for drug trafficking offenses behind closed doors.

Trump’s senior aid, Kellyanne Conway, who runs anti-drug initiatives at the White House, was quoted as saying that Trump’s position isn’t one-size-fits-all kind of initiative. She went on to make it clear that the president isn’t talking about your local marijuana dealer who sells a few dollars, but instead, he wants to go after the high-level dealers and kingpins who’s sales of millions of dollars of Fentanol translate to hundreds of casualties per week.

Trump has also praised the Philippine President Roderigo Duterte, who has led a massive extrajudicial crackdown on drugs in his country that has left thousands of high-level drug dealers dead. Last year, Trump even went as far as to contacting Duterte and told him he has done an “unbelievable job on the drug problem.”

If this new way of combating the U.S. Drug crisis goes into effect this would be the first time drug dealing would be classified as a capital offense. Currently, the only drug dealers who qualify for the death penalty have been the ones which have been involved in the murder or death of a law enforcement officer.

The president also made it clear he doesn’t see a lenient approach to drug-related crimes as being something that should be tolerated. And isn’t against the idea of implementing a campaign unlike Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” campaign of the 1980’s where children were taught the dangers of drug abuse, along with teaching the fact that they will die if they abuse drugs.

In an unprecedented move this week President Trump suggested using capital punishment for drug dealers in order to crack down on America’s opioid epidemic.

The President’s comments came just a few days after it was reported that he had been praising Singapore’s mandatory death penalty for drug trafficking offenses behind closed doors.

Trump’s senior aid, Kellyanne Conway, who runs anti-drug initiatives at the White House, was quoted as saying that Trump’s position isn’t one-size-fits-all kind of initiative. She went on to make it clear that the president isn’t talking about your local marijuana dealer who sells a few dollars, but instead, he wants to go after the high-level dealers and kingpins who’s sales of millions of dollars of Fentanol translate to hundreds of casualties per week.

Trump has also praised the Philippine President Roderigo Duterte, who has led a massive extrajudicial crackdown on drugs in his country that has left thousands of high-level drug dealers dead. Last year, Trump even went as far as to contacting Duterte and told him he has done an “unbelievable job on the drug problem.”

If this new way of combating the U.S. Drug crisis goes into effect this would be the first time drug dealing would be classified as a capital offense. Currently, the only drug dealers who qualify for the death penalty have been the ones which have been involved in the murder or death of a law enforcement officer.

The president also made it clear he doesn’t see a lenient approach to drug-related crimes as being something that should be tolerated. And isn’t against the idea of implementing a campaign unlike Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” campaign of the 1980’s where children were taught the dangers of drug abuse, along with teaching the fact that they will die if they abuse drugs.

 

“The “Just Say No” movement was one part of the U.S. government’s effort to revisit and expand the War on Drugs. As with most anti-drug initiatives, Just Say No—which became an American catch phrase in the 1980s—evoked both support and criticism from the public.

THE 80S CRACK EPIDEMIC

In the early 80s, a cheap, highly addictive form of cocaine known as “crack” was first developed.

The popularity of crack led to an increase in the number of Americans who became addicted to cocaine. In 1985, the number of people who said they used cocaine on a routine basis increased from 4.2 million to 5.8 million. By 1987, crack was reportedly available in all but four states.

Emergency room visits for cocaine-related incidents increased four-fold between 1984 and 1987.

The crack epidemic particularly devastated African American communities—crime and incarceration rates among this population soared during the 1980s.

REAGAN AND THE WAR ON DRUGS

When President Ronald Reagan took office in 1981, he vowed to crack down on substance abuse and reprioritize the War on Drugs, which was originally initiated by President Richard Nixon in the early 1970s.

In 1986, Reagan signed the Anti-Drug Abuse Act. This law allotted $1.7 billion to continue fighting the War on Drugs, and established mandatory minimum prison sentences for specific drug offenses.

During the Reagan years, prison penalties for drug crimes skyrocketed, and this trend continued for many years. In fact, the number of people incarcerated for nonviolent drug offenses increased from 50,000 in 1980 to more than 400,000 by 1997.

SAY NO TO DRUGS

President Reagan’s wife, Nancy Reagan, launched the “Just Say No” campaign, which encouraged children to reject experimenting with or using drugs by simply saying the word “no.”

The movement started in the early 1980s and continued for more than a decade.

Nancy Reagan traveled the country to endorse the campaign, appearing on television news programs, talk shows and public service announcements. The first lady also visited drug rehabilitation centers to promote Just Say No.

Surveys suggest the campaign may have led to a spike in public concern over the country’s drug problem. In 1985, the proportion of Americans who saw drug abuse as the nation’s “number one problem,” was between 2 percent and 6 percent. In 1989, that number jumped to 64 percent.

D.A.R.E. PROGRAM

In 1983, the chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, Daryl Gates, and the Los Angeles Unified School District started the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program.

The program, which still exists today, pairs students with local police officers in an effort to reduce drug use, gang membership and violence. Students learn about the dangers of substance abuse and are required to take a pledge to stay away from drugs and gangs.

D.A.R.E. has been implemented in about 75 percent of U.S. school districts.

Despite the program’s popularity, several studies have shown participating in D.A.R.E has little impact on future drug use.

A study funded by the Department of Justice, which was released in 1994, revealed that partaking in D.A.R.E led to only short-term reductions in the use of tobacco but had no impact on alcohol or marijuana use.

In 2001, the Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. David Satcher, put D.A.R.E in the category of “ineffective primary prevention programs.”

Proponents of D.A.R.E have called some of the studies flawed and say surveys and personal accounts reveal that the program does in fact have a positive effect on future drug use.

In recent years, D.A.R.E has adopted a new “hands-on” curriculum, which advocates believe is showing better results than more outdated approaches to curbing drug abuse.

SUPPORT AND CRITICISM FOR THE ANTI-DRUG WAR

Determining whether the War on Drugs movement was a success or failure depends on whom you ask.

Supporters of the strict drug initiatives say the measures reduced crime, increased public awareness and lowered rates of substance abuse.

Some research does, in fact, suggest that some aspects of the tough policies may have worked. A study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services revealed that in 1999, 14.8 million Americans used illicit drugs. In 1979, there were 25 million users.

However, critics say the 1980s version of the War on Drugs put too much emphasis on deterrence tactics and not enough focus on drug treatment and substance abuse programs.

Another common criticism is that the laws led to mass incarceration for nonviolent crimes. According to the Prison Policy Initiative, more than 2.3 million people are currently being held in the American criminal justice system. Nearly half a million people are locked up because of a drug offense.

Many people also felt the Reagan-era policies unfairly targeted minorities. Part of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act included a heftier penalty, known as the “100-to-1 sentencing ratio,” for the same amount of crack cocaine (typically used by blacks) as powdered cocaine (typically used by whites). For example, a minimum penalty of five years was given for 5 grams of crack cocaine or 500 grams of powdered cocaine.

Minority communities were more heavily policed and targeted, leading to a disproportionate rate of criminalization. But the Fair Sentencing Act (FSA), which was passed by Congress in 2010, reduced the discrepancy between crack and powder cocaine offenses from 100:1 to 18:1.

There is perhaps one thing both supporters and critics of the 1980s drug war can agree on: The policies and laws put into place during the Just Say No era created a drug-focused political agenda that still impacts many Americans today.””

 

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ITALY FIRST! Italians Follow Trump, Cutting Funding To Migrants To Help Their Own Citizens Who Are In Need

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The most reliable and balanced news aggregation service in the world, RWN offers the following information published by VOICE OF EUROPE:

With 5 million Italians living in poverty, Italian deputy Prime Minister, Matteo Salvini, has stated that they will cut the migrant funds and use that money for Italians.

“I don’t like the fact that with 5 million Italians living in poverty we have to spend €5 billion-a-year for these migrants,” he said at a rally a few days ago. “We will cut these funds and use them for Italians”.

He went on to say that “with fewer taxes, with fewer foreigners, with more security, we will once again be the most beautiful country in the world”.

Last week a poll was released putting Salvini’s party at 31 per cent, ahead of the Five Star Movement by two points. Salvini also has a favourable approval rating of 56 per cent. A full seven points ahead of Five Star Leader Luigi Di Maio.

There is speculation that the surge in his popularity, due to his weekly rallies and photo-ops the past few months, will result in a fresh election against his coalition partners, the Five Star Movement, which he would likely win.

Note From the Editor: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of this website or of the owners/administrators of where this article is shared online. Claims made in this piece are based on the author’s own opinion and not stated as evidence or fact.

 

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IT’S OVER: Trump Just Released His First Re-Election Campaign Ad & it’s Going Viral

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President Trump tweeted out what is seemingly the first re-election campaign ad for 2020 and it went viral overnight. This will give you chills.

It’s about 2 minutes long and it starts by playing audio of President Trump’s 2016 campaign promises from different speeches. Then, it shows the images of him keeping these promises.

Then, in the final minute of the video, you hear President Trump deliver a message directly to the “forgotten man” and “forgotten women” in a truly emotional way that sums up President Trump and the patriots who support him.

Never ever ever give up. Never stop fighting for what you believe in, and for the people who care about you.

Carry yourself with dignity and pride.

Relish the opportunity to be an outsider. Embrace that label because it’s the outsiders who change the world and who make a real and lasting difference.

Treat the word impossible as nothing more than motivation.

I am asking all citizens to embrace this renewal of the American spirit. Seize this moment. Believe in yourselves. Believe in your future. And believe once more in America.

I will fight for you with every breath in my body. And I will never ever let you down.

The forgotten man and the forgotten woman. You’re not forgotten anymore.”

 

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Al Sharpton Doesn’t Rule Out Running For President, Criticizes Trump

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Rev. Al Sharpton, one of the most visible figures of Black Lives Matter, has not ruled out running for president in 2020.

Sharpton said he wasn’t currently exploring a presidential run but did not rule out running, BuzzFeed News reported Tuesday.
“I never rule anything out,” Sharpton said.

Sharpton was in Florida Sunday leading protests against Florida’s stand your ground laws after the death of Markeis McGlockton. Michael Drejka shot and killed McGlockton in July. Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri did not charge Drejka due to Drejka claiming he feared for his life.

Sharpton has been highly critical of President Donald Trump, calling him a racist at a Sunday rally because Trump stumped for Republican Rep. Ron DeSantis of Florida and didn’t mention McGlockton’s name.

“You want to know why we call you a racist? [You] talk like a racist and you walk like a racist and you act like a racist!” Sharpton said at the rally, according to BuzzFeed News.
Sharpton also criticized Pastor Darrell Scott, who called Trump “the most pro-black president that we’ve had in our lifetime,” on Aug. 3. He also argued that black ministers were cowards for not bringing up McGlockton’s name when they visited the White House that day.

“I won’t bow to Pharaoh, and I won’t bow to Donald Trump,” Sharpton said.

If Sharpton were to run, he would join a crowded Democratic primary. Sen. Kamala Harris of California, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York and former Vice President Joe Biden are just a few high-profile Democrats who have hinted at running for the Democratic Party presidential nomination.
Sharpton has run for office before. He ran for the Senate three times in the 1980s and 1990s and the presidency in 2004.

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